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Jill Moon Shares Insight On Asian Carp Invasion

On the Illinois River summer 2012. Photo by Jill Moon/The Telegraph, Alton, IL

On the Illinois River summer 2012. Photo by Jill Moon/The Telegraph, Alton, IL

The invasive Asian Carp is the topic of discussion on this week’s “Behind The Editor’s Curtain.” For the last several years, Jill Moon, a reporter and editor for The Telegraph, Alton, IL, has followed the Asian carp issue.

Moon talks with Don Corrigan about the carp invasion, the environmental and economic issues they create, and a few of the efforts underway to curb their spread.

One solution to slow the spread is to start eating the leaping carp. Working to convince Americans the Asian carp can be a tasty option is Chef Philippe Parola, according to Moon. She describes the experience of sampling different recipes using the invasive fish, such as soup and carp cakes.

To hear Corrigan’s interview with Jill Moon, click on the video below.

 

Produced by Holly Shanks. Music provided by House of Cowboy.

 

 

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2 responses to “Jill Moon Shares Insight On Asian Carp Invasion

  1. Hi Don,
    Good news. We are NOT their only predator. Blue and flathead catfish love silver and bighead carp; several of the record and near record fish caught in the lower Missouri and the mid-Mississippi (around here) have been chuck full of those quys. If you are interested in getting a taste of Asian carp, contact Professor Mark Morgan at Mizzou, or give a call over to Powder Valley, and they can put you in touch with the MDC folks who fry up the white parts of the fish, and teach you how to fillet them. They taste sort of like farm raised catfish; like river caught catfish, better if taken live and allowed to swim in clean water for a day or so.
    Best wishes
    Jo Schaper.

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  2. Thank you, Jo. I do want to try some Asian carp fritters one of these days, although I don’t think they will ever take the place of the catfish fritters at my favorite stand in Grafton near the Fin Inn. So where can I find your columns on Missouri geology, since the RHT moved to the other side of the state? I miss your rock hound wisdom!

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